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Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 50

The Meaning of Life

The grappling for meaning in life finds its ultimate rest with the Giver and Sustainer of life, the Person of Jesus Christ. The search to find the “meaning of life” finds its end point or beginning point in Jesus Christ. Faith in Jesus Christ as revealed in the Scriptures gives a full and abundant life.

John 1:1-4, 14 (KJV) 1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 The same was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. 4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men… 14 And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 49

Paul and Silas in Prison

What would you do if you were unjustly thrown into prison? Some would grumble, growl, grouch, grouse, and gripe. Others would fume and fuss, moan and groan.

Paul and Silas were not only cast into prison but were stripped and beaten and severely flogged. They yearned to preach the Gospel. Instead, they were in solitary confinement – beaten and bloody, their feet fastened in tortuous stocks. What could they do?

The account reads: “And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them.” (Acts 16:25)Why were death-row inmates singing praises instead of the blues? Because God gave them a song that turned them into a duo with a duet in their dungeon. God was the “choir director” that night who provided the sheet music for his two- midnight minstrels. Paul and Silas had learned with afflicted Job that “God giveth songs in the night.”




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 48

God Will Take Care of You

Isaiah 41:10 Fear thou not, for I am with thee; be not dismayed, for I am thy God; I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness.

The prophet Isaiah gave these words to the poor and afflicted of God’s people so that they may be encouraged and strengthened in the heart to trust Him to take care of them.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 47

Beneath the Cross of Jesus

From One Who Followed the Way of the Cross
The cross is the sacred symbol of the Christian faith. There our burden of sin was life. There we experienced the wonderful grace of our Lord and Saviour. Our sins and guilt were nailed to that cross. Since we came to that old rugged cross, life has never been the same. There we found salvation and life abundant and eternal.

One of the great hymns of the cross was written by Elizabeth Clephane (1830-69) of Scotland. She learned the meaning of the cross when as a young child she lost both her parents. From her youth she was in delicate health. Although frail, she gave herself in service to the poor and sick.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 46

Parable of the Ten Virgins

Matthew 25:1-13
Marriage is the oldest institution in the world and God intended it to be a happy one, a lifetime ahead of loving and cleaving. And the wedding marks the celebration and solemnisation into this honourable, exclusive, permanent and fulfilling partnership between the husband and the wife. And the time leading to the matrimony of the bride and the bridegroom is a process of preparation.

Our Lord Jesus presented a marriage scene in the parable of the ten virgins with the preparation leading up to a marriage to describe the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, the heavenly Bridegroom to take His bride, the true church to His heavenly home and a heavenly banquet.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 45

16th Century Reformation in Germany

Martin Luther (Part 4)
When Luther left Worms he anticipated a speedy journey to Wittenberg, but the unexpected happened. At a considerable distance from Worms the path entered a glen, thickly forested even to the tops of the surrounding hills. Suddenly there emerged from the woods a company of horsemen, armed to the teeth. They surrounded the carriage in which the reformer was riding, seized him and hurried away. Their journey ended at a stately castle some eight miles away. Its name was Wartburg and it occupied the top of a hill overlooking Eisenach.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 49

Paul and Silas in Prison

What would you do if you were unjustly thrown into prison? Some would grumble, growl, grouch, grouse, and gripe. Others would fume and fuss, moan and groan.

Paul and Silas were not only cast into prison but were stripped and beaten and severely flogged. They yearned to preach the Gospel. Instead, they were in solitary confinement – beaten and bloody, their feet fastened in tortuous stocks. What could they do?

The account reads: “And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them.” (Acts 16:25)




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 44

16th Century Reformation in Germany

Martin Luther (Part 3)
The pope first treated the matter of Martin Luther’s 95 theses lightly, but quickly changed his mind when he found out how serious was the threat to his authority and to the doctrine of the Church. He demanded that Luther should recant, and summoned him to appear in Rome. He also demanded that Frederick the Wise should deliver up this ‘child of the devil’ to the papal legate. In response Frederick suggested that the pope should send a delegate before whom Luther might appear and plead his cause and to this the pope finally agreed. He sent Cardinal Cajetan to Germany and Luther duly appeared before him.




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 43

16th Century Reformation in Germany

Martin Luther (Part 2)
Luther’s chief struggle had to do with the phrase ‘ the righteousness of God’. He was convinced that in Romans 1:17 and elsewhere these words referred to the awful holiness of God, and His unchanging hatred of sin and sinners. How could he, Martin Luther, ever achieve the kind of holiness that would turn away the anger of God against him?

He did not yet understand Paul’s words in Romans that the gospel is the saving power of God to everyone who believes in Christ, because it reveals the righteousness of God. This righteousness of God is nothing other than Christ’s perfect obedience to His Father’s will in life and death, ‘even the death of the cross’ – obedience which God counts as belonging to all those in whose place Christ died. Just as the punishment of the believer’s sin was borne by Christ so it is because of Christ’s righteousness that the same believer, though ungodly in himself, is pronounced ‘just’ or righteous in the sight of God. In this way, Paul says, faith receives the righteousness of God: ‘To him that worketh not but believeth on him that justifies the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness’ (Romans 4:5).




Lord’s Day, Vol. 5 No. 42

16th Century Reformation in Germany

– Martin Luther (Part 1)

Martin Luther, the Reformer, belonged to a peasant family in Saxony, Germany, ‘My father, grandfather, all of my ancestors were thorough peasants’, said Luther. His father bore the name of Hans (John), his mother Gretha (Margaret). They lived in Eisleben where Hans Luther earned his livelihood by mining, specially for copper which was abundant in the hills. Their son was born on the 10th November 1483, and as observed by the Roman Catholic Church, he was named after that saint. Half a year after his birth the family moved to Mansfield, about six miles from Eisleben.




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